U.S. House takes crucial step toward cleaning up toxic 'forever chemicals'

 | 
Aaron Colonnese
Content Creator

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Content Creator

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.

As the nickname suggests, toxic PFAS "forever chemicals" won't go away on their own. Rather, we have to act to mitigate the threats these substances pose.

That's why we applauded U.S. House lawmakers when, on July 21, they passed the bipartisan PFAS Action Act.

PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are used in consumer and commercial products from rain gear to firefighting foam. When they seep into the environment, they can cause health problems including birth defects and cancer.

“Nearly all Americans have PFAS in our bodies. This year, researchers even found PFAS in breast milk," said Danielle Melgar, PIRG’s Zero Out Toxics advocate. "It's long past time to get PFAS cleaned up and give our children and our children’s children a chance at healthier lives."

The bill passed by the House would designate two types of PFAS as hazardous, direct the EPA to limit PFAS discharged to waterways, and place a moratorium on new PFAS chemicals.

Read More.

Learn more about our campaigns to zero out toxics.

GET INVOLVED
Tell your U.S. senators to protect public health from toxic PFAS

The U.S. House of Representatives has already passed the PFAS Action Act, bipartisan legislation that would classify PFAS as toxic and make PFAS contamination eligible for the EPA's cleanup programs for toxic chemicals. Now it's time for the Senate to act. Will you send an urgent message to your senators today?

Photo: The bipartisan PFAS Action Act would direct the EPA to both clean up areas currently contaminated by PFAS and prevent further discharge of the chemicals into our waterways. Credit: public domain

Aaron Colonnese
Content Creator

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Content Creator

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.